The Anne Frank House – more than a museum

The organisation

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The Anne Frank House was established on 3 May 1957, with the close involvement of Anne’s father, Otto Frank. It is an independent, non-profit organisation dedicated to the preservation of Anne Frank’s hiding place and her diaries, and to spreading the message of Anne Frank’s life and ideals worldwide.

On the basis of Anne Frank’s life story, set against the background of the Holocaust and the Second World War, the Anne Frank House develops educational programmes and products with the aim of raising young people’s awareness of the dangers of anti-Semitism, racism and discrimination and the importance of freedom, equal rights and democracy.

The Anne Frank House is able to carry out its mission thanks to the income it receives from the museum and the support of funds, donors and grant-giving bodies.

Annual Report 2016

The Anne Frank House is an independent, non-profit organisation. Read our Annual Report with an overview of activities in 2016.

To the Annual Report
Het Anne Frank Huis aan de Prinsengracht. The Anne Frank House at the Prinsengracht.

Anne Frank House and Anne Frank Fonds

Two organisations, two missions...

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Partners

Thanks to our international partners, our educational products and projects can be found all over the world.

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Donations

Support the activities of the Anne Frank House.

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The beginning

The Anne Frank House was founded on 3 May 1957 with the primary aims of preserving the Anne Frank House and spreading the message of Anne Frank’s life and ideals. Following a fundraising drive, restoration work began in 1958, and the Anne Frank House was officially opened as a museum on 3 May 1960. Otto Frank was closely involved in setting up the Anne Frank House. He was a member of the management board of the Anne Frank House from 1961 to 1976, and subsequently a member of the board of governors until his death in 1980.

Otto Frank met met het bestuur van de Anne Frank Stichting voor Prinsengracht 263 (1957)
Otto Frank with the first board members of the Anne Frank House in 1957. From left to right: Floris Bakels, Otto Frank, Truus Wijsmuller and Herman Heldring.

Our mission

The Anne Frank House is an independent organisation entrusted with the care of the Secret Annexe, the place where Anne Frank went into hiding during World War II and where she wrote her diary. It brings her life story to the attention of people all over the world to encourage them to reflect on the dangers of anti-Semitism, racism and discrimination and the importance of freedom, equal rights and democracy.

Anne Frank Collection

The Secret Annexe and Anne Frank’s diary papers are the most important components of the Anne Frank Collection. The collection also contains many other unique items, including letters, photos and artefacts of the Frank family, the other people in hiding and their helpers. The Anne Frank House preserves this collection, carries out research and puts items from the collection on public display.

Education

As an educational organisation, the Anne Frank House develops and distributes educational programmes and products that provide inspiration and connect with the experiences of young people all over the world. The life story of Anne Frank always forms the basis for these initiatives. Anti-Semitism, prejudice, unequal treatment and the denial of civil rights played a crucial role in the life story of Anne Frank. The Anne Frank House opens up these themes for discussion, with the aim of raising awareness and changing attitudes among young people.

Peer guides at the Anne Frank exhibition in Croatia.

Strategic Aims

On the basis of the Anne Frank House’s mission, the following aims have been formulated for the period up to 2019:

  • We aim to carefully preserve the Secret Annexe - the place where Anne Frank went into hiding during World War II and where she wrote her diary - and to give the opportunity to visit this place to everyone who wants it.
  • We aim to share the life story of Anne Frank with as a many people as possible worldwide on the basis of a historically reliable, authentic and engaging presentation of her life story.
  • We aim to prevent and counteract anti-Semitic attitudes and actions.
  • We aim to raise our target groups’ awareness of patterns of thought and behaviour that underlie racism and discrimination, and encourage them to make an active contribution to the promotion and maintenance of an open, pluralist, democratic society.

Activities

Based on the strategic aims, four themes have been formulated that serve as a framework for the Anne Frank House’s activities in the period 2012-2015:

  1. Anne Frank, her work and the history of her time
    We publicise the life story of Anne Frank, and make use of her diary to tell that life story and spread the message of her ideals. The history of her time - not only restricted to the Second World War, the persecution of the Jews and the Holocaust - had an enormous influence on her life, and in this sense it plays a major role in the educational work of the Anne Frank House. We will also convey basic knowledge on the Second World War, the persecution of the Jews and the Holocaust to our target groups, taking due consideration of regional and local perspectives in the case of projects in other countries.
  2. Anti-Semitism
    We develop and implement educational programmes to prevent the development of anti-Semitic ideology and counteract existing anti-Semitism. Knowledge of historical examples of anti-Semitism (such as anti-Semitism in the Middle Ages) is important for employees of the Anne Frank House, but does not form a learning aim as such in our educational activities (of course with the exception of the anti-Semitism of the Nazis).
  3. Prejudice and discrimination
    We primarily aim to raise awareness of patterns of thought and action that can lead to prejudice, stereotyping and discrimination, with a specific focus on prejudice and discrimination in relation to origin, skin colour and cultural background, and ‘classic’ extreme right-wing ideology. We do not develop activities relating to other common forms of discrimination such as that against the LGBT community or Muslims. Other organisations with more specific expertise in these areas concern themselves with this. The same applies to the growth of extremist ideologies, such as the radicalisation of young Muslims, unless this concerns ‘classic’ extreme right-wing ideology. Nevertheless, these and other forms of discrimination may come to the fore during educational programmes.

The Anne Frank House publishes an annual report listing its most important activities of the previous year: Annual Report 2016.

(Annual Reports 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015)

Management

The Directors are responsible for the management of the Anne Frank House. They are appointed by the Supervisory Board, which supervises the policy of the Directors and provides them with advice. In addition to the Supervisory Board the Anne Frank House also has an Advisory Board, made up of representatives of various sections of society. The Advisory Board advises the Supervisory Board on issues that are definitive for the identity of the Anne Frank House. In effect the Advisory Board acts as a ‘sounding board of society’.

Finance

The Anne Frank House is mainly dependent on museum visits for its income: revenues generated by the museum cover more than ninety-five percent of the annual budget. For the financing of its other large projects the Anne Frank House relies on finance from a variety of funds, collaborating partners, friends and donors, or subsidies from the European Union and the Dutch government. For our museum activities we receive no subsidy.
Financial statement in our Annual Report 2016.